Ephrem

The Holy Mar Ephrem (✝ 373), the Harp of the Holy Spirit and Deacon of the church of Nisibis, served for most of his life in Nisibis until he and the other inhabitants were compelled to go west as a result of Emporer Jovian's cession of Nisibis to Persia in 363. St. Ephrem ultimately settled in Edessa where he spent the final decade of his life. Ephrem's influence on successive generations of Syriac Christendom cannot be overstated. For more information on his life and works, see S. P. Brock, St. Ephrem: A Brief Guide to the Main Editions and Translations. 2012 [Online]. Available: http://syri.ac/brock/ephrem. St. Ephrem's popularity has resulted in several misattributions of works from various authors and time periods. The works below which likely have been misattributed will be indicated with an *. Some of St. Ephrem's genuine works only remain preserved in Armenian translation.1 

Works Cited

Instrumenta

For more information regarding modern editions, see S. P. Brock, St. Ephrem: A Brief Guide to the Main Editions and Translations. 2012 [Online]. Available: http://syri.ac/brock/ephrem. The works found below contain the following information: 1) an English translation of the title, 2) a title from the the edition, 3) if falsely attributed, a note concerning other attributions, 4) a hyperlink to other editions available in the Public Domain, and 4) corresponding modern editions according to S. P. Brock, St. Ephrem: A Brief Guide to the Main Editions and Translations. 2012 [Online]. Available: http://syri.ac/brock/ephrem

[Go to Obverbeck] [Go to Lamy] [Go to Zingerle & Mösinger]

Assemani, Sancti Patris Nostri Ephraem Syri

(For all of Assemani's entries, the Syriac text contains parallel Latin translation)

Overbeck [Back to Top]

Lamy [Vol. 1Vol. 2Vol. 3Vol. 4[Back to Top]

(For all of Lamy's entries, the Syriac text contains parallel Latin translation)

P. Zingerle & G. Mösinger [Back to Top]